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課程來源:TED
     

 

Joe Sabia 談說故事的技術

Joe Sabia: The technology of storytelling

 

Photo of three lions hunting on the Serengeti.

講者:Joe Sabia

2011年5月演講,2011年11月在TED上線

 

翻譯:TED

編輯:朱學恆、洪曉慧

簡繁轉換:洪曉慧

後製:洪曉慧

字幕影片後制:謝旻均

 

影片請按此下載

MAC及手持裝置版本請按此下載

閱讀中文字幕純文字版本

 

關於這場演講

iPad說書人Joe Sabia向聽眾介紹了Lothar Meggendorfer,他創造了一個大膽的說故事技術:立體書。從洞穴壁畫到講台上的iPad,Sabia藉由這個演進歷程,闡述新技術的發展如何幫助我們說出自己的故事。

 

關於Joe Sabia

Joe Sabia研究新的說故事方式-將廣受歡迎的影片、新顯示技術與傳統的敘述方式融合在一起。

 

為什麼要聽他演講

Joe Sabia自稱為「創意人、創造者、顧問、合作夥伴及策展人」,他幫助企業及組織說出更好的故事。但你或許知道他也是以下影片的創造者…

Tupac in Kazakhstan」,數十名哈薩克人接力演唱Tupac Shakur的《改變》。

Seven Minute Sopranos」,快速回顧《黑道家族》影集片段。

Google Goes Gaga

History of Lyrics That Aren't Lyrics

 

Joe Sabia的英語網上資料

About: Joe Sabia

 

[TED科技‧娛樂‧設計]

已有中譯字幕的TED影片目錄(繁體)(簡體)。請注意繁簡目錄是不一樣的。

 

Joe Sabia 談說故事的技術

 

先生女士們,大家圍過來吧!我想跟你們分享一個故事。

 

曾經,在19世紀的德國,有著書本這樣事物。在那段期間,書本是說故事的主角。它是令人崇敬的,它是無所不在的,但它有點沉悶。因為在它400年的存在期間,說書人從未將書本進化成一個說故事的設備。但一位作者來臨,永遠改變了遊戲方式。(音樂)他的名字是LotharLothar Meggendorfer,Lothar Meggendorfer斬釘截鐵地說,「Genug ist genug!」(夠了!)他一把抓住他的筆,拿起他的剪刀,這名男子拒絕墨守成規,決定將書頁闔上,歷史會將Lothar Meggendorfer記載為-還會有誰?-世上第一位兒童立體書的真正發明人。(音樂)對於這個喜悅、這份奇蹟,人們歡欣鼓舞。(歡呼聲)他們因為故事的留存而喜悅,世界因此繼續轉動。

 

Lothar Meggendorfer不是第一個改變說故事方式的人,當然也不會是最後一個。無論說書人是否意識到,他們都沿續著Meggendorfer的精神,當他們從歌劇到歌舞劇,從新聞廣播到廣播劇,從膠卷相片到電影,到有聲電影、彩色電影、3D電影,到VHS和DVD,似乎都脫離不了這個Meggendorfer狂熱。

 

當網際網路出現後,情況變得更有趣。(笑聲)因為人們不僅可以在世界各地播出他們的故事,還可以用似乎無限數量的設備這麼做。例如,一間公司透過自己的搜尋引擎訴說愛情故事;一間台灣的製片工作室(編註:壹傳媒集團的NMA),藉由3D動畫來詮釋美國政治。(笑聲)一名男子透過一個叫Twitter的平台講述他父親的故事,分享他父親說的髒話。

 

在這一切之後,大家暫停腳步,退一步審視。他們意識到,在6000年的說故事歷史中,他們從在洞穴牆壁上描繪狩獵場景,到在Facebook塗鴉牆上描繪莎士比亞。這是值得慶祝的,說故事的藝術保持不變,大部分故事被一再重述,但人類說故事方式的演變總是充滿純然的新奇。

 

它們紀念了一個人,一位了不起的德國人,每當一個新的說故事設備出現時。因此聽眾們-可愛、美麗的聽眾從此過著幸福快樂的生活。(掌聲)

 

以下為系統擷取之英文原文

About this Talk

iPad storyteller Joe Sabia introduces us to Lothar Meggendorfer, who created a bold technology for storytelling: the pop-up book. Sabia shows how new technology has always helped us tell our own stories, from the walls of caves to his own onstage iPad.

About the Speaker

Joe Sabia investigates new ways to tell stories -- meshing viral video and new display technologies with old-fashioned narrative. Full bio and more links

Transcript

Ladies and gentlemen, gather around. I would love to share with you a story.

Once upon a time in 19th century Germany, there was the book. Now during this time, the book was the king of storytelling. It was venerable. It was ubiquitous. But it was a little bit boring. Because in its 400 years of existence, storytellers never evolved the book as a storytelling device. But then one author arrived, and he changed the game forever. (Music) His name was Lothar, Lothar Meggendorfer. Lothar Meggendorfer put his foot down, and he said, "Genug ist genug!" He grabbed his pen, he snatched his scissors. This man refused to fold to the conventions of normalcy and just decided to fold. History would know Lothar Meggendorfer as -- who else? -- the world's first true inventor of the children's pop-up book. (Music) For this delight and for this wonder, people rejoiced. (Cheering) They were happy because the story survived, and that the world would keep on spinning.

Lothar Meggendorfer wasn't the first to evolve the way a story was told, and he certainly wasn't the last. Whether storytellers realized it or not, they were channeling Meggendorfer's spirit when they moved opera to vaudville, radio news to radio theater, film to film in motion to film in sound, color, 3D, on VHS and on DVD. There seemed to be no cure for this Meggendorferitis.

And things got a lot more fun when the Internet came around. (Laughter) Because, not only could people broadcast their stories throughout the world, but they could do so using what seemed to be an infinite amount of devices. For example, one company would tell a story of love through its very own search engine. One Taiwanese production studio would interpret American politics in 3D. (Laughter) And one man would tell the stories of his father by using a platform called Twitter to communicate the excrement his father would gesticulate.

And after all this, everyone paused; they took a step back. They realized that, in 6,000 years of storytelling, they've gone from depicting hunting on cave walls to depicting Shakespeare on Facebook walls. And this was a cause for celebration. The art of storytelling has remained unchanged. And for the most part, the stories are recycled. But the way that humans tell the stories has always evolved with pure, consistent novelty.

And they remembered a man, one amazing German, every time a new storytelling device popped up next. And for that, the audience -- the lovely, beautiful audience -- would live happily ever after. (Applause)


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